Remembering the Women Who Died Making it America

You’ve heard the phrase, “By the grace of G-d go I.” It means, it could have easily been me, my friends, or, in this case, my great-grandmother. Thankfully, it wasn’t anybody in my family. I’m here as testimony to that. I’m talking about the horrible fire that 2-chalk2014flyerbhappened in a shirtwaist factory in New York City.Sisters and mothers and daughters, and friends worked together in that factory and at the turn of the century-the early 20th Century-it was part of the bustling clothing and apparel industry in Lower Manhattan.  But, on March 25th, 1911 a fire broke out; exits were blocked; fabric dust ignited; women were burned alive or died trying to escape from the flames and lives were lost. It only took 30 minutes for 146 to perish.

I stumbled upon a website  streetpictures.org/chalkHere you can find the places where the women lived. If you walk around Manhattan, on March 25th you’ll be able to see TRIANGLE1-blog480where they lived as other women commemorate their lives, and also, their tragic deaths, in chalk, on the sidewalks by their addresses. Women are volunteering to write on the sidewalks. I wish I could be there to help. Perhaps it’s because many of the dead were immigrants, or the children of immigrants who had few choices as to where they could earn the money they needed to help their families make ends meet. They made things with their own hands, in America, working for the American dream. It could have been somebody I loved. It wasn’t. I am lucky.

 

Podcast Produced by Flatlands is On Fire!

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I love it when a good person has good things coming to her. In this case it’s a client of ours at Flatlands Avenue Productions.

We asked Detroit area business consultant Romy Gingras, an expert on running and managing social enterprise companies, if she would like to do a podcast. And, her answer was a cautious yes. She was taught how to use a microphone, how to record interviews on her laptop in person, and using online conferencing services, and listen to that dreadful stuff called criticism. Yup, media training by your friend Rita.

So, here’s this lady who knows so much, and teaches others how to make money while running a business that fulfills a need inside their communities and neighborhoods like; putting women’s shelter residents to work; finding jobs for young men and women who don’t want to go to college; training laborers in skills to rebuild Detroit and the rest of the U.S. infrastructure; creating safe work environments and fresh, organic food in urban areas where the super markets have long ago moved out…and she’s a great student too!(I’m tired just reading this graph.) What’s more is that this lady is on fire. Just today she recorded three new interviews for upcoming podcasts.  I used to call what she’s feeling  a, “radio-buzz.” Now I suppose I should call it “podcasting adrenalin.”

The Bonfires of Social Enterprise is just over a week old and has already been downloaded over 650 times. We’re proud of our great podcasting student, Romy Gingras, of Gingras Global. We’re inspired by her success. We hope you will be too!

Our news release is here> http://bit.ly/RomyRocks. Share the love, will ya?

Please take a listen to the podcast on iTunes and subscribe to it. (You’ll find the link to it in the release) If you’re like me, you’ll be interested in how other Americans are bravely starting their own businesses, making a profit, and doing good.

All my very best as we all countdown to Spring!

 

Rita